Summer/Fall Book Discussion Series. In-person, outside under our new tent- “Ecology and Indigenous Wisdom & History” Next Discussion Friday, Sept. 24th @ 4:30

THE NEXT BOOK IS “EDUCATION FOR EXTINCTION: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience” by David Wallace Adams.  Come get a copy of the book at the library or let us know if you want one set out for curbside pick up.

Sponsored by Vermont Humanities –

Sept. 24th @ 4:30 – Education For Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience by David Wallace Adams

Education for Extinction is a poignant and heartbreaking book that chronicles the infamous history of the U.S. government’s efforts to indoctrinate, deculturalize, and “Americanize” Native peoples through the use of boarding schools. Under the guise of “progress” and “civilization,” thousands of native children were forcefully removed from their families and cultures, and deprived of their peoples’ history. This book testifies to both the cruelties perpetrated against the hearts and minds of children and to the many acts of courage and resistance performed by these children. -Harvard Educational Review

October 22nd @ 4:30 – “Breeding Better Vermonters: The Eugenics Project in the Green Mountain State” by Nancy Gallagher

“Breeding Better Vermonters examines social, ethnic, and religious tensions and reveals how population studies, theories of human heredity, and a rhetoric of altruism became subtle, yet powerful tools of social control and exclusion in a state whose motto was “freedom and unity.”” – Amazon

November 19th @ 4;30 – “Another Turn of the Crank” by Wendell Berry“This popular collection features six essays on sustainability and stewardship from one of America’s most important cultural critics. Provocative, intimate, and thoughtful, Another Turn of the Crank reaches to the heart of Wendell Berry’s concern for our nation, its communities, and their future.”[/vc_column_text]

Next book is “Changes in The Land: Indians, Colonists and The Ecology of New England,” by William Cronon. Come get a copy of the book at the library or let us know if you want one set out for you for curbside pick up. Suzanne Brown will be leading the discussion.

November 19th @ 4;30 – “Another Turn of the Crank” by Wendell Berry“This popular collection features six essays on sustainability and stewardship from one of America’s most important cultural critics. Provocative, intimate, and thoughtful, Another Turn of the Crank reaches to the heart of Wendell Berry’s concern for our nation, its communities, and their future.”

Next book is “Changes in The Land: Indians, Colonists and The Ecology of New England,” by William Cronon. Come get a copy of the book at the library or let us know if you want one set out for you for curbside pick up. Suzanne Brown will be leading the discussion

Previous discussions:
“Changes in The Land: Indians, Colonists and The Ecology of New England,” by William Cronon. Come get a copy of the book at the library or let us know if you want one set out for you for curbside pick up. Suzanne Brown will be leading the discussion.
“In this landmark work of environmental history, William Cronon offers an original and profound explanation of the effects European colonists’ sense of property and their pursuit of capitalism had upon the ecosystems of New England. Reissued here with an updated afterword by the author and a new preface by the distinguished colonialist John Demos, Changes in the Land, provides a brilliant inter-disciplinary interpretation of how land and people influence one another. With its chilling closing line, “The people of plenty were a people of waste,” Cronon’s enduring and thought-provoking book is ethno-ecological history at its best.” – Books With Buzz

1st Discussion, July 9th @ 4:30 on Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer.

“As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these lenses of knowledge together to show that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings are we capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learning to give our own gifts in return.” – Goodreads

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